How To Install Edging For Plywood

How To Install Edging For Plywood Woodworking

How to install edging for plywood is article about Woodworking bookmarked by albert with ID 12285523848 was uploaded on 08-01-2019 and has been viewed 422,514 times.

Solid wood nosingPlywood is a great material for building cabinets, bookcases and shelves.But exposed edges usually look unfinished unless they're covered with a layer of wood.While wood veneer tape is one easy way to cover edges, a better method is to glue or nail on a str*p of solid wood nosing.

It's good looking and durable, and it protects vulnerable edges from abuse in high-wear areas.It also stiffens the plywood, an important feature for shelving.If you make it even wider than the plywood, as we show in this article, the extra stiffness will help keep plywood shelves from sagging.

And unlike thin veneer edgings, the wood nosing can be routed to create a decorative edge (Photo 8).In this article, we'll show you how to glue and clamp wood nosing to plywood and how to sand the top for a perfectly flush surface and nearly invisible joint.

Pipe clamps like the ones we're using are available at home centers, hardware stores and lumberyards.They're a good investment.They'll often come in handy for all kinds of gluing projects around the house.

Buy a length of black iron pipe (3/4 in.or 1/2 in., depending on your clamps) that's threaded on at least one end to complete each clamp (2-ft.and 4-ft.pipes are the most versatile).You'll also need a belt sander fitted with a 120-grit belt to sand the edges flush, but 100-grit sandpaper wrapped around a wood or rubber sanding block will also work.

It'll just take more elbow grease.Set up the clamps before you start gluingPhoto 1: Set up the clampsSet up the clamps (one every 8 to 10 in.), the clamp pads and the spacers on your workbench.Adjust the clamps to slightly wider than the shelf and nosing.

Your gluing and clamping operation will go more smoothly if you set up the clamps before you start.That way you can move quickly once you spread the glue.Photo 1 shows the setup we used.Any straight scraps of wood will work for the clamp pads.

They protect the nosing and plywood from the metal clamp faces and help spread the force of the clamps over a wider area.Use spacer boards to hold the plywood above the clamps and flush to the top edge of the nosing.

Start with straight-edged plywood and straight nosing boardsPhoto 2: Run a thin bead of glueSpread a thin layer of glue, about the thickness and width of a shoelace, along the plywood edge.You can use any size and thickness of nosing you want.

But 3/4-in.thick strips anywhere from 3/4 to 1-1/2 in.wide are easy to find and look great.If you don't own a table saw, you can cut a clean, accurate edge on plywood by clamping a straightedge to the sheet and using it as a guide for your circular saw.

Hardwood boards for nosing are available at home centers and lumberyards.If you want a 3/4-in.x 3/4-in.nosing, you'll have to rip it on a table saw or have it ripped at the lumberyard.Cut the plywood and nosing to length, or if you need more precision, leave it slightly long and cut it off later.

You don't need much gluePhoto 3: Spread the gluePress the nosing onto the plywood and move it back and forth to spread the glue.Detail of glue on nosingA thin layer of glue should completely cover the mating surfaces.

Photo 4: Place the shelf in clampsPlace the shelf and nosing in the clamps.Feel the joint with your fingertip and adjust the nosing until the top is a hair's width above the plywood as you tighten the clamps.

A thin layer of yellow wood glue is all it takes to make a virtually indestructible glue joint.Extra glue just makes a bigger cleanup job, and it causes the nosing to slide around, making alignment difficult.

To get a feel for the right amount, pull off the nosing after you've slid it back and forth on the glue (Photo 3) and look at the back.You should see a thin, even layer of glue covering both mating surfaces.

When you apply the clamps, a small bead of glue should ooze out of the seam.It's difficult to get the plywood and nosing to line up perfectly flush when you clamp them together.Snug up all of the clamps, but don't tighten them.

Then push the nosing up or down to adjust it as you tighten the clamps.Hold the nosing slightly above the plywood, about the thickness of a sheet of paper (Photo 4), and sand it flush after the glue dries.

No-Clamp NosingIf you're painting the plywood or you don't mind the look of filled nail holes, you can simply glue and nail the nosing into place rather than messing with clamps.Predrill holes for the 1-1/2-in.

finish nails and drive them below the surface with a nail set.Then fill the holes with wood filler or patching compound and sand them smooth before you paint, or fill them with matching putty after you stain and varnish the wood.

Use a nail set to drive the nail heads below the surface.Video: Make a Sanding Platform for Edge-Sanding WoodDon't let the glue hardenPhoto 5: Scrape off excess glueLet the glue set for about 30 minutes until it's rubbery and starts to change color.

Scrape off the partially hardened glue with a putty knife.Photo 6: Find and remove glue spots Moisten the surface with a damp rag to reveal dried glue smudges.Scrape them off while they're wet.Let the glue set another hour.

Cleaning up glue squeeze-out is easy if you catch it at the right time (Photo 5).At room temperature, the glue will set enough for you to remove the clamps and scrape off the excess in about 20 to 30 minutes.

Since the glue hasn't reached full strength, you still have to be careful not to jar the nosing loose.Removing the plywood from the clamps frees them up for the next piece and allows you easy access to scrape glue from both the top and bottom.

Dried glue smears are hard to see and can cause trouble when you apply finish to the plywood.Photo 6 shows how to expose dried glue by wiping it with a damp rag.The wetted glue shows up as a white spot that you can scrape off with a sharp-edged putty knife.

Sand carefully to avoid damaging the veneerPhoto 7: Lightly sand the nosingScribble a pencil line along the length of the plywood, overlapping it onto the nosing.Carefully sand the nosing with a belt sander and 120-grit belt until the pencil line disappears and the nosing is flush to the plywood.

Photo 8: Route the nosingClamp the shelf to the workbench and shape the edge of the nosing with a router and shaping bit.The top layer of plywood is a thin layer of wood, called veneer.It's easy to accidentally sand through this veneer and expose the lower layer of wood, which doesn't match the surface.

Use light pressure and a fine, 120-grit belt on the belt sander.Stop sanding as soon as you see the squiggly pencil line start to disappear over the glue joint (Photo 7).Be careful to hold the belt sander perfectly flat.

Tilting it toward the plywood could cause it to sand through the veneer.Tilting it away will bevel the nosing.If the nosing isn't quite flush, finish by hand-sanding.There are many other methods for getting the nosing perfectly flush to the plywood.

Experienced woodworkers use sharp planes and scrapers.A router with a flush-trimming bit also does a nice job.But both these techniques require practice for ideal results.If you want to dress up the edge of a plywood shelf, simply rout a shape on the solid wood nosing (Photo 8).

Make sure to wear safety glasses, hearing protection and a dust mask when routing.Move the router from left to right as you face the shelf.Oops, I Sanded Through!Over the years, I've glued on a lot of shelf nosing.

And by far the toughest part is sanding the nosing flush to the plywood.I can't tell you how many times I've accidentally sanded through the veneer in the process.Usually it's because I decided to remove the last bit of protruding nosing with the belt sander, rather than stop and finish sanding by hand.

But even sanding through the veneer isn't a fatal mistake.In most cases you can still use the shelf, and you'll be the only one who notices the mistake.Required Tools for this Project Have the necessary tools for this DIY project lined up before you start—you'll save time and frustration.

Pipe clamps work best for this project.If you don't have a miter saw, you can cut the nosing with a circular saw.Required Materials for this Project Avoid last-minute shopping trips by having all your materials ready ahead of time.

Here's a list...

Read More →

Disclaimer: images, articles or videos on this website sometimes come from various other media sources. Copyright is fully held by the source. If there are problems related to this, you can contact us on this page.
Bookmark ID: 12285523848

How to install edging for plywood is just one of the many collections of bookmark on this website. There are approximately 5379 posts that exist in our database associated with this article. Here are the details of "how to install edging for plywood" article:

Category:
Title:
Image URL:
Post URL:

This is a bookmark related to how to install edging for plywood, there are approximately 5379 article related to this woodworking category. Please see the details below and click on the title for more information..

How To Install Edging For Plywood Woodworking 150 x 100

How To Install Edging For Plywood

Solid wood nosingPlywood is a great material for building cabinets, bookcases and shelves.But exposed edges usually look unfinished unless they're covered with a layer of wood.While wood veneer tape is one easy way to cover edges, a better method is to glue or nail on a str*p of solid wood ... How to install edging for plywood is post about Woodworking bookmarked by marvin with ID 12285523848 was uploaded on 08-01-2019 and has been viewed 422,514 times.

How To Install Bottom Mount Drawer Slides Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Install Bottom Mount Drawer Slides

Completely hidden from view How to install bottom mount drawer slides is bookmark about Woodworking How To bookmarked by harvey with ID 12608429828 was uploaded on 28-02-2019 and has been viewed 410,700 times.

How To Tool Up For Straight Edge Gluing Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Tool Up For Straight Edge Gluing

Using 2x4s as flush clamp bars when gluing up boards edge to edge can easily result in misaligned boards toward the middle of the panel How to tool up for straight edge gluing is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by clinton with ID 1710875147 was uploaded on 24-02-2019 and has been viewed 89,678 times.

How To Make And Install Overlay Cabinet Doors Woodworking How To 150 x 100
How To Make And Install Overlay Cabinet Doors

Learn how to make and install overlay cabinet doors and drawers, including choosing hardware and installing it.Simple techniques and tips make the process easy How to make and install overlay cabinet doors is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by mario with ID 12868000230 was uploaded on 02-03-2019 and has been viewed 78,656 times.

How To Layout Your Boards For Glue Up Woodworking How To 150 x 100
How To Layout Your Boards For Glue Up

Learn how to layout your boards for glue up.WOOD magazine's Jim Heavey gives you some invaluable tips on how to arrange your boards for the best look.Knowing how to read the grain is very important to whether you're going to match your grain, book match your grain or sort by ... How to layout your boards for glue up is bookmark about Woodworking How To bookmarked by leslie with ID 14170236022 was uploaded on 05-01-2019 and has been viewed 226,398 times.

How To Orient The Grain For The Best Looking Raised Panel Door Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Orient The Grain For The Best Looking Raised ...

Learn how to orient the grain to make the best looking raised panel door.WOOD magazine's Jeff Mertz shows you how to visualize the grain through the use of simple cardboard patterns.You may incur a little more waste but your raised panel doors will look well balanced and professional.It's the attention ... How to orient the grain for the best looking raised panel door is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by wesley with ID 11319768229 was uploaded on 10-02-2019 and has been viewed 291,759 times.

How To Install Crown Molding Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Install Crown Molding

Learn how to install crown molding correctly.WOOD magazine's Jim Heavey gives you easy to follow instructions for a professional look How to install crown molding is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by brad with ID 13843902507 was uploaded on 14-03-2019 and has been viewed 189,352 times.

How To Make And Install Partial Overlay Cabinet Doors Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Make And Install Partial Overlay Cabinet Doors

Learn how to make and install partial-overlay cabinet doors, including hardware selection and installation.Simple tips and techniques make the process easy and WOOD magazine's Jeff Mertz will show you how How to make and install partial overlay cabinet doors is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by juan with ID 12823312581 was uploaded on 06-04-2019 and has been viewed 118,860 times.

How To Install Cabinet Drawers Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Install Cabinet Drawers

Learn how to make and install cabinet doors.This is just one element of a complete series on how to make simple face-frame cabinets.In this episode, WOOD magazine's Kevin Boyle pulls the drapes back on the mystical drawer installation.Really, once you know how it's not difficult at all How to install cabinet drawers is bookmark about Woodworking How To bookmarked by dennis with ID 11615638107 was uploaded on 12-02-2019 and has been viewed 299,305 times.

How To Make And Install Cabinet Doors Woodworking How To 150 x 100
How To Make And Install Cabinet Doors

Learn how to make and install cabinet doors.This is just one element of a complete series on how to make simple face-frame cabinets.In this episode, WOOD magazine's Kevin Boyle gives you some great tips on not only how to make the doors but some secrets to installing them too How to make and install cabinet doors is post about Woodworking How To bookmarked by brett with ID 149986876 was uploaded on 09-02-2019 and has been viewed 272,815 times.

How To Make A Plywood Throat Plate For Band Saws Shop Blog 150 x 100
How To Make A Plywood Throat Plate For Band Saws ...

It is surprising how important is a tight throat plate to ensure successful sawing on the bandsaw.A throat plate with a narrow kerf that flanks the blade neatly will prevent small wedge-shaped parts that separate during the sawing process from jamming the blade.Our Grizzly Band saw came with plastic throat ... How to make a plywood throat plate for band saws is article about Shop Blog bookmarked by johnny with ID 12846382922 was uploaded on 30-03-2019 and has been viewed 78,488 times.